Hidden in Plain ‘Site’ Preventing Online Sexual Exploitation Together

Description: The risk of online sexual exploitation of youth is rising, especially in the context of the #COVID19 pandemic. White Ribbon is pleased to offer a free webinar to parents on preventing all forms of #onlinesexualexploitation and #sextrafficking.

In this webinar, parents will learn more about:

  • Warning signs of sexual exploitation and sex trafficking
  • How to engage youth in practicing online safety
  • How to prevent this issue from happening through learning about healthy relationships, consent, allyship and equity
  • Help and resources available.

Facilitator: Taylor Demetrioff is the Bilingual Program Manager at White Ribbon. With over a decade working in the mental health field, Taylor has worked hard to bring positive programming and education to Canadian teens and adults.

Starting in his career, Taylor developed a mental health and music program for teens struggling with their mental well-being called “Let It Out!” while studying at l’Université de Saint Boniface on Treaty 1 land. More recently, Taylor has focused his efforts on fostering meaningful relations with Elders and Indigenous leaders across Canada to work collaboratively to challenge colonialism while maintaining a deep love, respect and appreciation for Indigenous cultures.

As a father, Taylor strives to work towards a future free from all forms of gender-based violence and discrimination while promoting healthy masculinities, gender equality and a healthier way of living for all.

How Ontario School Boards Identify and Support the Needs of Diverse Learners

This workshop will focus on Ministry of Education policies and processes related to supporting students with diverse needs and strengths. It will review the role of School Support Teams, Individual Learning Plans (ILPs), Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Identification Placement Review Committees (IPRC). It will also provide a forum for participants to ask general questions about how students with exceptionalities access various supports and how parents can best navigate these systems.

Facilitator: For the past 15 years Jody Chong has split her time between her roles as an Assistant Professor at The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto and the Toronto District School Board where she is employed as a Special Education Teacher.  Prior to this, she worked as a Reading Teacher with the Learning Disabilities Research Program at SickKids Hospital for almost ten years. Her research interests include reading difficulties and disabilities and the implementation of evidence-based literacy programs in classrooms.

Registration required. University of Toronto students, staff, postdoctoral fellows and faculty are welcome. Partners and family members (including chosen family members) who are co-caregivers with U of T students, staff, postdoctoral fellows and faculty are also welcome to attend. If you have any access needs to ensure your full participation in this event, please contact the Family Care Office and we will make appropriate arrangements.

Elder Care: The Role of the HCCSS (Home and Community Care Support Services) for the Caregiver

Date: Tuesday, February 28, 2023
Time: 12:00 – 1:30 pm
Location: *New* In person – OISE, 252 Bloor St. W., Room 2214

This in-person workshop presented by the Toronto Central Home and Community Care Support Services (HCCSS) will:

  • focus on in-home and community services available to assist you in providing care to an elderly person
  • provide you with information on the application process for admission into a long term care home and other community housing options
  • address caregiver stress and burnout with a focus on providing specific coping strategies

Facilitators:
Jennifer Thomas MSW, RSW is a  Care Coordinator with Home and Community Care Support Services, Toronto Central.  Jennifer has over 20 years of experience working with frail seniors and their caregivers at home and in the community including as part of the home visiting primary care program with the Mt Sinai Family Health Team

Tanya Poon is an occupational therapist by background, and a care coordinator with Home and Community Care Support Services, Toronto Central. She has a total of 13 years working in the community. For the past 10 years, Tanya has been embedded with the St Joseph’s Health Centre homebound family medicine team, together supporting frail and homebound seniors and their caregivers in the community

Registration required. University of Toronto students, staff, postdoctoral fellows and faculty are welcome. Partners and family members (including chosen family members) who are co-caregivers with U of T students, staff, postdoctoral fellows and faculty are also welcome to attend. If you have any access needs to ensure your full participation in this in-person event, please contact the Family Care Office and we will try our best to work with you and make appropriate arrangements.

How to Cope with Burnout

Exhaustion. Overwhelm. Depletion. Stress. Mental health. These words have become common in our vocabulary over the last 3 years. And for good reason. Many of us are bursting at the seams, and cannot cope with what’s going on. If you can identify with anything mentioned, you may be experiencing burnout. We know that many people are experiencing this right now, in various forms. How do we navigate it effectively? Learning how to manage stress to be able to care for your kids, parents, and anyone in between is essential to stay out of burnout. Take time to invest in yourself today!

Facilitator: Tara Rhodes is a certified life and leadership coach, speaker and an award-winning facilitator and trainer. She is dedicated to helping people gain the clarity and confidence to advocate for the life they want to live, and then developing the healthy habits to make that a reality. She firmly believes that life is too short to live a life that makes you unhappy, and is on a mission to help her clients take control of their lives so they can share their unique gifts with the world. A wife and mom to two lively boys, she actively practices what she preaches to maintain a healthy balance and presence in her every day. You can find out more at on Tara Rhode’s website.

Hidden in Plain “Site” Preventing Online Sexual Exploitation Together

The risk of online sexual exploitation of youth is rising, especially in the context of the #COVID19 pandemic. White Ribbon is pleased to offer a free webinar to parents on preventing all forms of #onlinesexualexploitation and #sextrafficking.

In this webinar, parents will learn more about:

  • Warning signs of sexual exploitation and sex trafficking
  • How to engage youth in practicing online safety
  • How to prevent this issue from happening through learning about healthy relationships, consent, allyship and equity
  • Help and resources available.

Facilitator: Taylor Demetrioff is the Bilingual Community Engagement Manager – Education at White Ribbon. With over a decade working in the mental health field, Taylor has worked hard to bring positive programming and education to Canadian teens and adults.

Starting in his career, Taylor developed a mental health and music program for teens struggling with their mental well-being called “Let It Out!” while studying at l’Université de Saint Boniface on Treaty 1 land. More recently, Taylor has focused his efforts on fostering meaningful relations with Elders and Indigenous leaders across Manitoba to challenge colonialism while maintaining a deep love, respect and appreciation for Indigenous cultures.

As a father and husband, Taylor strives to end gender-based violence while promoting healthy relationships, gender equality and healthy masculinities.

How to Adopt

Date: Monday, February 8, 2021
Time: 12:00 – 1:30 pm
Location: The webinar link will be shared with you via email prior to the session start time.

Have you ever considered adoption as a way of growing your family? The first step of your adoption journey is educating yourself about the process and options. This session, led by the Adoption Council of Ontario, will provide an overview of private, public and international adoption processes in Ontario. As well, information will be provided on the Home Study and the education process necessary to become eligible to adopt in Ontario. Helpful tips and strategies to ease the adoption journey will also be discussed.

Facilitator: Ellen Igumnova RSW, BSW

With her experience in children welfare, Ellen developed a passion for contributing to positive social change in our society by working towards finding permanent and stable homes for children involved in Ontario’s child welfare system. As a Clinical Coordinator, Ellen has been working with the AdoptOntario team and other professionals since Fall 2019 to create profiles for waiting children, communicate with prospective adoptive parents, identify matches and share information regarding adoption with the ultimate goal of finding permanence for children as every child deserves to grow up with love and support from a family that they can call their own.

Registration required. University of Toronto students, staff, faculty, postdoctoral fellows and their families are welcome. Please let us know if you have any mobility challenges so we can accommodate your needs.

Halloween ‘Character Treats’ – an online workshop for children and an adult family member

Halloween is a fun time when we use our creativity to transform ourselves and become something or someone else. In this Halloween-themed activity, children and their parents will identify their individual ‘character treats’. They will explore how their individual characteristics connect to those around them and why that can be a real treat! Participants will learn to face four Halloween ghosts: Denialin, Doubty, Worry-Anne and Fearan. This social and emotional learning activity is aimed at children 6 to 10 years of age. For this activity, please have paper, markers, crayons, coloured pencils and scissors.

Recommended for children 6 to 10 years and an adult family member.

Facilitator: Nana Gulic is an Education Doctorate student at OISE’s Social Justice Education Department. She is a Child and Youth Worker with 16 years of experience in working with youth in Canada and internationally. With youth empowerment and engagement as the guiding premise, she worked in residential group homes, community development programs, elementary schools and international organizations. Her academic and professional passions are social and emotional skill development and democratic education. Nana is also a mother to a 9-year old boy for whom she wishes to become a caring, empathic and engaged citizen.

Happy Parents, Happy Kids

Ann Douglas, a Canadian best-selling parenting author, provides a guide to parenting without anxiety, guilt, or feeling overwhelmed in her latest book:Happy Parents, Happy Kids.  In this presentation she will discuss:

  • Does parenting have to be this hard?
  • How to boost your enjoyment of parenthood
  • How to feel less anxious, less guilty, and less overwhelmed; and tap into the support you need

Facilitator: Ann Douglas sparks conversations that matter about parenting. She is a U of T graduate, and received her degree in History in 1985.  She is the weekend parenting columnist for CBC Radio and the creator of Canada’s bestselling series of pregnancy and parenting books, The Mother of All book series. Her most recent books are Happy Parents, Happy Kids and Parenting Through the Storm.  Please note her book Happy Parents, Happy Kids will be available for sale in the ODLC.

How Might We Create a More Family-Friendly UofT?  Student Parent Feedback Session

Date: Wednesday, June 19, 2019
Time: 10:00 – 11:30 am
Location: Robarts Library, Family Study Space, 9th Floor, Room 9-002.

The Innovation Hub​, in partnership with the Family Care Office, is looking to hear from student-parents on how U of T can be more family-friendly.  Join us to learn about the results of a research project the Innovation Hub conducted last year with student parents and then participate in interactive activities ​and dialogue that will generate practical ideas for how the university can better support student parents.  Your contributions will influence the future direction of student life programming and services.

As a thank you for participating, each participant will be provided with a $10 coffee gift card.

Facilitators: Innovation Hub staff members

University of Toronto current students are welcome.  You are also welcome to bring your child(ren) to this space, but please be advised you will be required to provide supervision.  We will have some toys and activities for the younger children under 5 years of age.  Light refreshments will be provided.

How Your Attachment Style Affects Your Parenting Style

Date: Tuesday, October 23, 2018
Time: 12:00 – 1:15 pm
Location: St. George campus, Koffler Student Services Centre, 214 College St., Room 313

In this workshop, parents will gain an understanding of:

  • Attachment styles (secure attachment, avoidant attachment, ambivalent attachment)
  • Discover how their attachment style with their primary caregiver influences their current parenting style.
  • Explore the impact of our attachment styles through interactive exercises
  • Gain insight into narratives around relationships we may have created that are blocking our growth.

Participants learn how they can be more aware of areas they need to work on to develop healthier relationships with their children. If one doesn’t know about their unconscious, default ways of reacting that are deeply ingrained in the psyche, there is no chance to consciously create positive change. There is a special emphasis put on practical techniques parents can try based on their attachment style in relating better to their children. In this way, the children may be more likely to develop a secure attachment style. Attachment styles and working models of relationships can change, and by changing a parent’s attachment style, their child’s attachment style can become more secure too.

Facilitator: Samantha Samuels is in her final year of the Masters of Counselling Psychology program at OISE, University of Toronto and has a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from York University. She has worked as a counsellor in not-for-profit and educational settings in Ontario. Through her studies in Psychology and couples/family therapy, she has researched the attachment styles and its impact on parent-child relationships in great depth. Samantha has developed and facilitated numerous workshops across the Greater Toronto Area and enjoys sharing information related to personal growth and self-development.